PLENARY SESSIONS

This years' programme is supported by high level presentations in three plenary sessions on topics within the overall theme 'Smart surveyors for land and water management'. These specially invited plenary speakers share insights into their own experience and pitfalls and present their vision and predictions covering the subtheme from each conference day.

Plenary Session 1 - Smart Surveyors

Jack Dangermond

Sisi Zlatanova

Frank Tierolff

Surveying and Geospatial Infrastructure
 
3D indoor modelling. Challenges and opportunities
Use and applications of new technologies

Plenary Session 2 - Integraded Land and Water Management

 

Nick van de Giesen

Gordana Jakovljovic

 
New observational methods for water, weather and climate in Africa with results from the TWIGA Project 
Mapping plastic – the step forward for a cleaner environment.
 

Plenary Session 3 - Ten years to achieve the SDG's

 

Emmanuel Nkurunziza

Janet Edeme

 
Land Regularization
Equal land rights for all 
 



Time schedule


Monday 11 May 2020
11:00-12:30

Plenary Session 1:
Smart Surveyors


Tuesday 12 May 2020
09:00-10:30

Plenary Session 2:
Integraded Land and
Water Management


Wednesday 13 May 2020
09:00-10:30

Plenary Session 3:
Ten years to achieve the SDG's



Plenary Session 1 - Smart Surveyors

Jack Dangermond


Founder and President
Esri - Environmental Systems Research Institute

Surveying and Geospatial Infrastructure

Abstract: GIS is evolving, becoming an interconnected network of Geospatial web services. These services are increasingly being organized with next generation GIS Portals that virtually integrate data and services from many sources. As this framework emerges, it will increasingly depend on a strong foundation of survey information. This presentation will illustrate common patterns of use as well as the conceptual and technical constructs that are essential to make geospatial infrastructure emerge.

Bio: A landscape architect by training, Jack Dangermond founded Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri) in 1969 with a vision that computer mapping and analysis could help us design a better future. Under Dangermond's leadership, that vision has continued to guide Esri in creating cutting-edge GIS and Geodesign technologies used in every industry to make a difference worldwide. Dangermond fostered the growth of Esri from a small research group to an organization recognized as the world leader in GIS software development.

Esri employs more than 4,000 people worldwide. Many who shared his passion for GIS in the early days are still with the company and remain dedicated to helping the users to be successful.

 

Sisi Zlatanova


Professor
Head of GRID
Faculty of Built Environment, UNSW Sydney

3D indoor modelling. Challenges and opportunities

Abstract: Research in support of indoor mapping and modelling (IMM) has been active for over thirty years. This research has come in the form of As-Built surveys, Data structuring, Visualisation techniques, Navigation models and so forth. Much of this research is founded on advancements in photogrammetry, computer vision and image analysis, computer graphics, robotics, laser scanning and many others. While IMM is used to be the privy of engineers,  planners,  consultants,  contractors,  and designers,  this is no longer the case as commercial enterprises and individuals are also beginning to apply indoor models for navigation and facility management or Smart Cities and Digital twins. During the presentation challenges and opportunities related to IMM and the users will be shared and discussed.

Bio: Sisi Zlatanova is a professor and head of GRID at the Faculty of Built Environment, UNSW Sydney. Sisi has been conducting research in many aspects of 3D geoinformation: data representation, structuring, analysis and BIM/GIS integration. Her recent research concentrates on 3D Indoor modelling and navigation. She is author and co-author of more than 400 papers and 23 books. She has been involved in the work of several internationa organisations. She is the president of ISPRS TC IV on Spatial Information science, the treasurer of UDMS and a co-chair of OGC SWG IndoorGML

Frank Tierolff


Chairman
Executive Board of Kadaster

Use and applications of new technologies

Abstract - TBA

Bio: Frank is the new chairman of the Executive Board of the Netherlands’ Cadastre, Land Registry and Mapping Agency, in short: Kadaster. His focus is to position and represent Kadaster at national and international level. Main areas of responsibility are Strategy and Policy, Finance and Governance, Human Resources and Facility Management. He is a promoter of Kadaster as a partner in the GEO sector and emphasizes the relevance of innovation. Frank is a strong ambassador of partnerships between the academic, private and public sector.

After studying Dutch Law in Maastricht, he started his career in the banking sector. Shortly afterwards, he continued his career at Kadaster as policy and legal advisor. Since 2006, Frank has held several senior management positions. Prior to his recent role as chair, he was a member of the Executive Board for 5 years and responsible for landregistry, surveying, landreform, mapping and ICT. Before 2014, Frank held several positions as member of the executive board (core business, IT) at head office and branch offices. 

Plenary Session 2 - Integraded Land and Water Management

Nick van de Giesen 



Professor
University Delft, CiTG

New observational methods for water, weather and climate in Africa with results from the TWIGA Project

Bio: Nick van de Giesen received the Kandidaats (B.Sc.) and M.Sc. degree in land and water management from Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, The Netherlands, in 1984 and 1987, and the Ph.D. degree in agricultural and biological engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, in 1994. After a postdoctoral position with the West Africa Rice Development Association, Bouaké, Côte d’Ivoire, he was a Senior Researcher for six years with the Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn, Germany. Since 2004, he holds the “Van Kuffeler” Chair of Water Resources Engineering at Delft University of Technology, Netherlands. He is chairman of the Delft Global Initiative, co-director of the Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory (www.tahmo.org), and member of several international scientific advisory boards.

Abstract: Africa lacks behind most of the rest of the world when it comes to environmental observations. Only about sixty meteorological stations deliver operational data that are fed into forecast systems. No wonder that rainfall predictions for tomorrow in most of Africa are about as (un)reliable as ten day forecasts in Europe. The good news is that new sensors, cheap electronics, and extensive cell phone coverage could very well facilitate an environmental observation revolution in Africa. The European TWIGA project (www.twiga-h2020.eu) tries to accomplish exactly that. Here, some examples are presented that may be of interest to a broader public. For example, GPS/GNSS receivers for consumers have much improved over the past years as a result of the quest for self-driving cars. These receivers now use two frequencies, which was previously only done by expensive geodetic stations. We use these receivers to estimate atmospheric water content with near-millimeter accuracy and to make accurate flood hazard maps. Although no panacea for the continent’s massive challenges, these and similar instruments will support sustainable development of its human and natural resources.

Gordana Jakovljovic



Young Surveyor, Ph.D Student
Assistant teacher - Faculty of Architecture Civil engineering and Geodesy University of Banja Luka

Mapping plastic – the step forward for a cleaner environment.

Abstract: More than 8 million tonnes of plastics end up in the ocean each year. Land-based sources are considered the dominant input of plastics, especially, rivers draining areas with high population density and industrial development represents kay enter point of plastics debris to the ocean. Although marine debris has become a significant concern for the health of ocean and humans there are many questions about sources, pathways, and trends in abundance of marine plastic. This presentation will examine the developed methodology and results of the identification of floating plastic by using remote sensing and geospatial technologies. Produced maps should be used as a base for the creation of action plans for removing plastic from the environment.

Bio: Gordana Jakovljević is currently employed as a teaching assistant in the field of remote sensing and cartography at Faculty of Architecture Civil engineering and Geodesy, University of Banja Luka. She is a Ph.D. student and she finalizes the preparation of her thesis. Her practical and theoretical research deals with the application of remote sensing technology in the field of environment protection, especially in water management. She published several papers in journals and scientific conferences proceedings and she was involved in international and national projects. She is a member of FIG commission 4 (Hydrology) and working group 4.3 – mapping plastics.

Plenary Session 3 - Ten years to achieve the SDG's

Emmanuel Nkurunziza



Director General
Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD)

Land Regularization

Abstract - TBA

Bio - Dr. Emmanuel Nkurunziza is the Director General of Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development (RCMRD) – an intergovernmental organization with 20 contracting Member States in Eastern and Southern Africa. He took up this position early this year after an 8 year tenure as the Director General of Rwanda Natural Resources Authority, a position he held concurrently with that of Chief Registrar of Land Titles. Dr. Nkurunziza provided the technical and strategic direction to the development and implementation of Rwanda's land reform programme that managed to bring all land in the country under registered title and established a modern land administration system. The titling programme in Rwanda pioneered full-scale implementation of what are now generally referred as fit-for-purpose land administration techniques and approaches.

Dr. Nkurunziza's academic background is in Land Surveying but holds a masters degree in Urban planning from the University of Wales (Cardiff) and PhD in Public Policy from the University of Birmingham (UK). He began his career in the academia, having worked in various roles as Research Fellow and Lecturer in the Universities of Makerere (Uganda) and Birmingham (UK). He has undertaken research and published on urban land delivery systems as well as livelihoods.

Janet Edeme



Head Rural Economy Division in the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture
African Union Commission

Equal land rights for all

Abstract - TBA

Bio - Dr. Janet Edeme is presently the Head, Rural Economy Division in the Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture of the African Union Commission in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. She has a B.Sc. in Botany from the University of Calabar in Nigeria, an M. Sc. In Agricultural Biology with specialization in Plant Pathology from the Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry of the University of Ibadan, and a P.hD from the Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology of the University of Ibadan in conjunction with Texas AM University, College Station, USA and the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture (IITA) in Ibadan, Nigeria. Over a career spanning 26 years, Dr. Edeme has worked and garnered experience as a Plant Pathologist, an Agricultural Development Specialist and a Policy Formulation and Development Analyst. From August 1988 to 1989, she worked as an assistant lecturer in one of the Universities in Nigeria. Between August 1998 and 2000, after her Ph.D. she worked as a Post-Doctoral Scientist (Plant and Seed Health) in the Forage Genetics Resources Unit of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. She has worked as a consultant for various international organizations ranging from UNAIDS, UNESCO-IICBA(International Institute for Capacity Building in Africa) and FAO. As a consultant for the FAO, she was seconded to the AU-Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture of the African Union to strengthen the capacity and facilitate the establishment of the Department. Within the African Union Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture, she is the focal point following up on the status of implementation of initiatives and programmes adopted by the AU Heads of State and Government, such as the implementation of the AU Abuja Declaration on Fertilizer, The AU Declaration on Land through the Land Policy Initiative, The Comprehensive African Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) and the African Seed and Biotechnology Programme (ASBP) to name a few.

PROGRAMME

The Theme
Programme at a Glance
Opening Ceremony
Plenary Sessions
Forums
Technical Programme
Technical Tours